It's the Fall Season!

HI EVERYONE!!!! It has been a couple of months since my last blog. I have been teaching up a storm and having a great time. 

Lately, it has been exciting times in all the shops where I have been honored to teach. The students came to class with open minds and were willing to try new stitches, threads, and techniques they had never tried before. What more could a teacher ask for!!!!!!

I just finished teaching for Creative Stitches and Gifts in Dallas and Cindy, Diane, Dwana, and Melissa were great, as always. This was a Canvas Embellishment class with wonderful diversity in the canvas choices. In this class, I had a mix of students who have been in my classes several times along with some exciting (and excited) new students ( a special shout out to Becky, Janet and Janise). 

We explored lots of new and interesting techniques. One in particular was very exciting to watch develop. My friend and wonderful stitcher, Linda Beane, stitched on Machelle Sommerville’s “First Frost”, a huge tree in an evening setting with a sky of changing colors and a moon.

We interpreted the moon in Blackwork and the sky in a slowly descending open pattern I designed for Linda. 

A new stitch for the Sky and 5-step Blackwork pattern for the Moon.

A new stitch for the Sky and 5-step Blackwork pattern for the Moon.

We stepped right outside of that box when we got to the tree. I found 3 different weight brown fabrics, one with a diamond pattern (darker brown), one with a swirling pattern (medium golden brown), and a sheer fabric in a medium brown. I had Linda free cut the fabrics and appliqué them to the tree, randomly overlapping the fabric if necessary.

First Frost, design by Machelle Sommerville, from Fleur de Paris's Ziba Collection, with the three fabrics shows below.

First Frost, design by Machelle Sommerville, from Fleur de Paris's Ziba Collection, with the three fabrics shows below.

Some appliqués were padded with felt, others were embellished with rows of Outline stitch worked in pearl cotton to create ridges and higher texture. Once the appliqués were placed, then Linda stitched freely on top of them to blend the fabric pieces together with line stitches such as Hungarian Braided Chain, Portuguese Knotted Stem, Raised Chain Band, Whipped Chain, Twisted Chain, Laced Chain, Whipped Backstitch, and Packed Outline. 

Look closely at the stitches on top of the fabric which has been appliquéd in random pattern.

Look closely at the stitches on top of the fabric which has been appliquéd in random pattern.

As she worked toward the narrower ends of the branches, I asked her to tear the sheer fabric into strips, thread the fabric into a #16 Chenille Needle, twist the fabric and work Stem stitch with it keep the texture high and very forward. The fine curled ends of the branches were a continuation of the Twisted Thread Packed Stem but with #16 Kreinik Braid. 

Zoom in so you can see all of the different top stitching which simulates bark. Laced chain over the top left fabric, and below that you can see Wrapped Chain going in two different directions using 2 different colors of Accentuate.

Zoom in so you can see all of the different top stitching which simulates bark. Laced chain over the top left fabric, and below that you can see Wrapped Chain going in two different directions using 2 different colors of Accentuate.

I know Linda will post her progress on Facebook. Please look for it. I hope this sparks your imagination to include different textures into your own work.

I did spotlight Linda’s canvas because it was so different, but everyone in the class was working wonderful and exciting techniques, exposed stitches to let the thread and painted canvas blend together, Or Nué Diagonal Pattern Couching, lots of shading with counted and non-counted techniques, ribbon work ( LOVE THAT), Raised Stem Filling, Free-Form Fly, and so many more techniques too numerous to mention. 

At the end of this week, I am fortunate enough to step in for my dear friend Beth Robertson to teach with my good buddy Suzanne Howren at ANG National Seminar in Myrtle Beach. The weather should be perfect, the stitchers excited and attending with wide-open arms and minds. Hope to see you there, but if not, happy stitching!

 

Love

Tony